Tuesday, 10 April 2018

Hafragrautur

MEGA BLOGGING MARATHON - APRIL 2018

#87TH BLOGGING MARATHON

THEME: EXPLORE THE FLAVORS - INTERNATIONAL BREAKFAST
DAY 8

"Breakfast like a King, Lunch like a Prince and Dine like a Pauper"

   Yesterday we were invited to hubby's uncle's birthday. He is in his 80s. Still pretty strong, but as he is aging he tends to talk less.However that is made up with all the chit chat that my aunt does. She's a very lively person and loves to talk.  The party went well. It was just relatives and a handful of people they know. All was good, the food, the liveliness and the youngest at the party was about 9-10 months and the oldest being our Uncle.

   What got me thinking during the party was how some adults tend to disregard kids. When our kids were growing up, hubby hardly ever drank alcohol in front of the kids especially when it was a family outing. If he wanted to enjoy his Campari and Coke or rum and coke and I would want to indulge in a glass of wine, we'd do that when we went out without the kids.As they grew up, then we would explain to them what we are drinking and why its not for them. They would be happy to have their soft drink or juice. Times have changed and nowadays everyone tends to enjoy a drink or two in front of kids. I don't say anything is wrong with that. However, at the same time it is important to let kids know what the limit is. However, a certain group of people we know tend to get together ever so often to drink and drink and drink till they are just too drunk. Then the singing, loud talks, stupid jokes all begin. And their young kids or grand kids are watching their behavior. So yesterday this boy who is barely 5 or 6 years old, asked his mum why he doesn't have a drink in his hand like his dad. She was not able to explain to him. After a while he questioned why his dad was shouting. Is this the kind of example young parents are setting for their kids? When he grows up and if his parents or grandparents will not explain the right and wrong this kid will think its okay to get drunk and misbehave.

   That's my thought for today. Now lets get to today's recipe. My breakfast dish for Day 8 is  Hafragrautur (an please don't ask me to pronounce that as I just can't!). This hearty breakfast is from ICELAND.  Iceland has a very short growing season as it has long winters. This results in them not being able to produce any crops. However, they rely heavily on seafood and dairy products. Most Icelanders eat breakfast at home and not on the go like majority of the Americans.

   One hearty and filling meal that most Icelanders have is Hafragrautur. Simply put is it porridge.  What's so different about this porridge you may ask? Well, first of all water, milk and oats are added to a pot and allowed to simmer till it becomes pretty thick. Then its topped with some butter, sprinkled with brown sugar and sometimes a few raisins and nuts are added. Oatmeal being high in fiber and filling keeps the Icelanders going till lunch time. After breakfast, be it Hafragrautur or Skyr (a protein packed yogurt cheese) it has to be followed with lýsi which is Cod liver oil. Its an essential part of the meal as they don't get enough of natural sunlight to produce Vitamin D. Cod liver oil is a rich source of Vitamin D.

   Without much delay lets check out this easy to make, hearty, filling and nutritious porridge recipe.






HAFRAGRAUTUR

Serves 2

½ cup oats
1 cup water
1-2 cups milk

Topping:

2 tsp brown sugar
1 tbsp raisins
1-2 tbsp chopped nuts
2 tsp butter
  1. Heat the water in a pan. 
  2. Add oats and mix well.
  3. As it begins to thicken add the milk.
  4. Lower the heat and let the porridge simmer till it becomes thick. Remember to stir it occasionally so that the porridge does not burn at the bottom.
  5. Spoon out the porridge into serving bowls.
  6. Add butter, raisins, nuts.Top it with a knob butter and sprinkle some brown sugar.
  7. Serve immediately.
Tips:
  • You can add whatever topping you prefer to make it into a hearty meal the way your prefer.
  • Use a thick based saucepan.
A-Z breakfast Dishes:

A - Apple Aebleskiver - Denmark
B - Baghrir - Morocco
C - Changua - Colombia
D - Dutch Baby Pancakes - Germany/USA
E - English Breakfast - England
F - French Toast - Canada
G - Griddle/Girdle Scones - Scotland

Check out what other Mega Blogging Marathoners have made for Day 8:

An InLinkz Link-up

Sending this recipe to the following event:



   

12 comments:

  1. Such an elegant Hafragrautur, feel like finishing that bowl. Icelandic porridge tempts me a lot. Nutritious breakfast definitely.

    ReplyDelete
  2. It is very interesting to note the eating habits of Icelanders. A tongue twister for sure. I have oats almost 3-4 days a week. I don't add any sweetener or butter but love to add seasonal fruits as toppings.

    ReplyDelete
  3. This is how they used to serve porridge in my previous work place but never knew it had its own name. ;-) Regarding parenting, I see this a lot too. Not sure what to say. :-(

    ReplyDelete
  4. wow thats an delicious and healthy sweet porridge for breakfast, looks fabulous .. I am loving the topping a lot just reminds me of our kheer. Wonderful informative post and a very nice choice from iceland .. Loved reading the post !!

    ReplyDelete
  5. Though I am having tough time pronouncing that dish, it surely sounds fantastic to have made something from a new place..Nice thoughts..wish young parents are more mature than what they are sometimes..

    ReplyDelete
  6. We as parents must set an example for the kids. They follow what they see. Later we cannot find fault with their actions when the parents are to blame!! And I made this for one of the BM editions. I am not used to sweet oatmeal for breakfast so hubby had it and said it was good. I like your topping!

    ReplyDelete
  7. Such a healthy and fulfilling breakfast it is , Mayuri. I do add nuts and raisins in my oats porridge !!! It's informative to know about the icelander's eating habits. Nice thoughts on Parenting !!!

    ReplyDelete
  8. The porridge sounds lovely, what I like about is the topping. It takes the porridge to another level, what a great pick.

    ReplyDelete
  9. The toppings is absolutely yumm and lovely presentation.. Will just fall for it!!

    ReplyDelete
  10. That is such a hearty and delicious looking porridge from Iceland Mayuri. So simple yet so yummy.

    ReplyDelete
  11. i m trying ot pronounce it right mayuri, LOL! why they have to complicate the names for such simple recipes!!!! Love the porridge, love the addition of butter and the garnishes look rich!!

    ReplyDelete
  12. I can have this warm bowl of porridge with brown butter and nuts almost everyday. I guess with time everything’s changing be it drinking, watching tv or i should say lifestyle.

    ReplyDelete

Thank you for stopping by. Your comments are valuable to me.

Tuesday, 10 April 2018

Hafragrautur

MEGA BLOGGING MARATHON - APRIL 2018

#87TH BLOGGING MARATHON

THEME: EXPLORE THE FLAVORS - INTERNATIONAL BREAKFAST
DAY 8

"Breakfast like a King, Lunch like a Prince and Dine like a Pauper"

   Yesterday we were invited to hubby's uncle's birthday. He is in his 80s. Still pretty strong, but as he is aging he tends to talk less.However that is made up with all the chit chat that my aunt does. She's a very lively person and loves to talk.  The party went well. It was just relatives and a handful of people they know. All was good, the food, the liveliness and the youngest at the party was about 9-10 months and the oldest being our Uncle.

   What got me thinking during the party was how some adults tend to disregard kids. When our kids were growing up, hubby hardly ever drank alcohol in front of the kids especially when it was a family outing. If he wanted to enjoy his Campari and Coke or rum and coke and I would want to indulge in a glass of wine, we'd do that when we went out without the kids.As they grew up, then we would explain to them what we are drinking and why its not for them. They would be happy to have their soft drink or juice. Times have changed and nowadays everyone tends to enjoy a drink or two in front of kids. I don't say anything is wrong with that. However, at the same time it is important to let kids know what the limit is. However, a certain group of people we know tend to get together ever so often to drink and drink and drink till they are just too drunk. Then the singing, loud talks, stupid jokes all begin. And their young kids or grand kids are watching their behavior. So yesterday this boy who is barely 5 or 6 years old, asked his mum why he doesn't have a drink in his hand like his dad. She was not able to explain to him. After a while he questioned why his dad was shouting. Is this the kind of example young parents are setting for their kids? When he grows up and if his parents or grandparents will not explain the right and wrong this kid will think its okay to get drunk and misbehave.

   That's my thought for today. Now lets get to today's recipe. My breakfast dish for Day 8 is  Hafragrautur (an please don't ask me to pronounce that as I just can't!). This hearty breakfast is from ICELAND.  Iceland has a very short growing season as it has long winters. This results in them not being able to produce any crops. However, they rely heavily on seafood and dairy products. Most Icelanders eat breakfast at home and not on the go like majority of the Americans.

   One hearty and filling meal that most Icelanders have is Hafragrautur. Simply put is it porridge.  What's so different about this porridge you may ask? Well, first of all water, milk and oats are added to a pot and allowed to simmer till it becomes pretty thick. Then its topped with some butter, sprinkled with brown sugar and sometimes a few raisins and nuts are added. Oatmeal being high in fiber and filling keeps the Icelanders going till lunch time. After breakfast, be it Hafragrautur or Skyr (a protein packed yogurt cheese) it has to be followed with lýsi which is Cod liver oil. Its an essential part of the meal as they don't get enough of natural sunlight to produce Vitamin D. Cod liver oil is a rich source of Vitamin D.

   Without much delay lets check out this easy to make, hearty, filling and nutritious porridge recipe.






HAFRAGRAUTUR

Serves 2

½ cup oats
1 cup water
1-2 cups milk

Topping:

2 tsp brown sugar
1 tbsp raisins
1-2 tbsp chopped nuts
2 tsp butter
  1. Heat the water in a pan. 
  2. Add oats and mix well.
  3. As it begins to thicken add the milk.
  4. Lower the heat and let the porridge simmer till it becomes thick. Remember to stir it occasionally so that the porridge does not burn at the bottom.
  5. Spoon out the porridge into serving bowls.
  6. Add butter, raisins, nuts.Top it with a knob butter and sprinkle some brown sugar.
  7. Serve immediately.
Tips:
  • You can add whatever topping you prefer to make it into a hearty meal the way your prefer.
  • Use a thick based saucepan.
A-Z breakfast Dishes:

A - Apple Aebleskiver - Denmark
B - Baghrir - Morocco
C - Changua - Colombia
D - Dutch Baby Pancakes - Germany/USA
E - English Breakfast - England
F - French Toast - Canada
G - Griddle/Girdle Scones - Scotland

Check out what other Mega Blogging Marathoners have made for Day 8:

An InLinkz Link-up

Sending this recipe to the following event:



   
Pin It

12 comments:

  1. Such an elegant Hafragrautur, feel like finishing that bowl. Icelandic porridge tempts me a lot. Nutritious breakfast definitely.

    ReplyDelete
  2. It is very interesting to note the eating habits of Icelanders. A tongue twister for sure. I have oats almost 3-4 days a week. I don't add any sweetener or butter but love to add seasonal fruits as toppings.

    ReplyDelete
  3. This is how they used to serve porridge in my previous work place but never knew it had its own name. ;-) Regarding parenting, I see this a lot too. Not sure what to say. :-(

    ReplyDelete
  4. wow thats an delicious and healthy sweet porridge for breakfast, looks fabulous .. I am loving the topping a lot just reminds me of our kheer. Wonderful informative post and a very nice choice from iceland .. Loved reading the post !!

    ReplyDelete
  5. Though I am having tough time pronouncing that dish, it surely sounds fantastic to have made something from a new place..Nice thoughts..wish young parents are more mature than what they are sometimes..

    ReplyDelete
  6. We as parents must set an example for the kids. They follow what they see. Later we cannot find fault with their actions when the parents are to blame!! And I made this for one of the BM editions. I am not used to sweet oatmeal for breakfast so hubby had it and said it was good. I like your topping!

    ReplyDelete
  7. Such a healthy and fulfilling breakfast it is , Mayuri. I do add nuts and raisins in my oats porridge !!! It's informative to know about the icelander's eating habits. Nice thoughts on Parenting !!!

    ReplyDelete
  8. The porridge sounds lovely, what I like about is the topping. It takes the porridge to another level, what a great pick.

    ReplyDelete
  9. The toppings is absolutely yumm and lovely presentation.. Will just fall for it!!

    ReplyDelete
  10. That is such a hearty and delicious looking porridge from Iceland Mayuri. So simple yet so yummy.

    ReplyDelete
  11. i m trying ot pronounce it right mayuri, LOL! why they have to complicate the names for such simple recipes!!!! Love the porridge, love the addition of butter and the garnishes look rich!!

    ReplyDelete
  12. I can have this warm bowl of porridge with brown butter and nuts almost everyday. I guess with time everything’s changing be it drinking, watching tv or i should say lifestyle.

    ReplyDelete

Thank you for stopping by. Your comments are valuable to me.